Blog

Channel 47

Posted by Jon Bach on March 8, 2010 I was once lucky enough to have been chosen to keynote at the 2008 STAR West conference. As often happens when I do testing talks, I got an epiphany the night before – an anchoring idea to frame my talk and make it more memorable. The conference […]

Read More

Numbers don’t lie?

Posted by Jon Bach on January 20, 2010 It’s a simple statement, but I honestly don’t know what it means. It’s said by testing pundits at conferences and by project managers who want to make a point that there is truth in the numbers they are using in their reports, but to me, there’s always […]

Read More

Context-free Guessing

Posted by Jon Bach on December 15, 2009 I blogged previously about the coolest movies and TV shows that have a testing allegory, but sometimes it’s a TV show that has nothing to do with testing that inspires thoughts about testing. This one was a great reminder that our thoughts change as new context emerges. […]

Read More

Using Code Coverage in Test

Posted by Richard Bustamante on October 7, 2009 Code coverage tools enable a user to see which lines of code they’re executing and which lines they’re not for a given project. During testing this can be helpful to find any gaps where code isn’t being executed, and get a feel for what sections are being […]

Read More

Equivalence Class Partitioning

Posted by Richard Bustamante on September 15, 2009 Why test the same thing twice? I was recently introduced to a technique called Equivalence Class Partitioning (ECP) while reading “How we test software at Microsoft,” which aims to reduce redundancy when testing an input by identifying equivalent values. BJ Rollison gives a fairly rigorous definition using […]

Read More

Structures in Exploration

Posted by Quardev, Inc. on August 20, 2009 Isn’t exploration unscripted, unrehearsed, extemporaneous, ad hoc, make-it-up-as-you go, random, thoughtless testing? And isn’t that the point? To let Serendipity help you find bugs by having you bump into them by accident? You’d think that, but it’s not. Think about great historical explorers. Did they just set […]

Read More

Managing Test Automation with Bugs

Posted by Richard Bustamante on April 2, 2009 Test code has a tendency to bypass the rigors of normal development, since it will never be used externally and is more prone to rapid changes, it’s easy to slip into taking an ad hoc approach even in a long term project But in a sense, writing […]

Read More

The Agile Revolution: Champion of an Era Gone By?

Posted by Jacob Stevens Has the impact that a development model makes been diminished by the advent of Web 2.0 and continuous integration technologies? We’ve had over a decade of results from the Agile Revolution, since the culture of anti-Waterfall doctrine rose up and liberated, in the minds of many, a generation of development teams […]

Read More

Have you ever done acceptance testing?

In a previous post , I mentioned my role on the Microsoft Patternsand Practices team as they produce a guidance book on acceptance testing. We’re right in the thick of production and one of the ideas I’m helping them flush out is the notion of what acceptance might be in as many contexts as possible. […]

Read More

Be Joe Schmoe

By Nat Burnett When a person heads to Best Buy and purchases a brand new software application they take it home and set it on the kitchen table, make some lunch, and then carefully open the box.They then spend 4 hours reading the documentation, making sure they know how to operate it most efficiently and […]

Read More